Not True

Not True
May 1, 2016 Gary Shotton

I have heard a lot of “deals” that seemed better than I could have expected.  I have tried to hold to this belief, “If the deal seems too good to be true, it probably is NOT TRUE“. By Gary Shotton #000053

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Not True

By Gary Shotton

This text is in Extreme Rough draft and will be edited in the near future.

Hello. My name is Gary Shotton, and I’m going to talk to you today on something I think that will help you in your business. We hope it inspires you to do better business. We don’t have any workbook for you to follow, we don’t have any outline at this point for you to check off this. Just apply some of these teachings. We hope that these lessons inspire better business, and we ask that you should consider sharing with other people if these are beneficial today. We’re going to talk about “Not True.” I use this statement occasionally and repeatedly. I say you know if it sounds too good to be true, it’s not true. That’s pretty good advice. If it sounds to be good to be true, it’s generally not true. That should be the biggest signal you possibly could have, to dig deeper, to go farther, to ask yourself some deep questions, There’s just no way this could be true, but you would be surprised how much of a pull, how much of even myself, I want to gravitate over to this is a deal, this is a deal of a lifetime. I’m sitting in the right spot at the right time. I wasn’t thinking about it, and this miracle of a good deal came my way. Probably not true. Now, there’s a difference when I have done my due diligence, and I have studied the subject, and I have been very aggressively building a case on what I should do and like in buying a truck or buying a piece of equipment, I have found that there will be a better than normal deal come my way, but it’s not so ridiculously unusually normal that it’s too good to be true. So there’s a little balance there. Okay. Let me talk about a couple people. they’re public figures, it’s not people that I’m trying to bad-mouth or any more anyway. But, here about five years ago we had a gentleman, I’ll give his name since it’s public, but I’ll also refer to what he was doing. His name is Bernie Madoff and this gentleman, that’s the only time I’ll use his name, Bernie. He seemed to have an ability in investing people’s money, and he would take people’s money and he would invest it in some ways that would give them a good return, actually an unbelievably good return. Such a good return that it was too good to be true, and he really suckered a lot of sharp people with hundreds of thousands and millions of dollars. Some of it was money that these people own themselves, they had worked hard to get, and sometimes it was investment money from a fund. How could this many people get fooled? But, the deal was too good to be true and it wasn’t true. So over a period of time this thing starts unraveling, starts to becoming noticed, starts to become after a lot of effort by one person they got it exposed, and Mr. Bernie is setting in the penitentiary right now for the rest of his life, and he has no close family ties. One of his sons committed suicide, the other one the ex-wife of that son changed their name. They do not want to be named and associated with that name. All of this is public knowledge. How could this happen? Somebody in the process should have said it’s a deal too good to be true, therefore, it’s not true. This happened closer to me, in a particular situation. I certainly will not go into detail on this, but some friends of mine invested in something and the statement was these people who are investing money in a fund that they’re so good, the return normally would be by five or six percent on return on their money, and in this case they were promising or expecting ten, twelve, fifteen percent return on their money. Twice the norm. How could this be true? I was approached. I asked “Explain how this works” and they had some explanation of all this being invested in some miraculous way they figured out how to invest in the world market, and I said there’s no way, it’s too good to be true. I didn’t invest. This hurt some people, some friends of mine, and if you’re listening to this and it applied to you, I have not identified you, and I’m not making ridicule of you. I’m not exposing you in any way. I’m just trying to help others. If it’s a deal that’s too good to be true, it’s probably not true. How many times can I say that? It’s probably not true and you gotta dig way deeper. There’s no such thing as buy it now. This is the last day you must sign today. It won’t be here tomorrow. You know when that comes up to me, It’s an automatic nope! You just pulled the trigger. You just identified yourself. There’s nothing such a good deal that it’s not going to be here tomorrow. Now, there’s a difference, keep in mind. If I have done my research, I have done all of the study ahead of time, I’ve done my footwork, I know the facts, and then something comes in that’s quite a bit better than expected, I’ll take that deal every single time because I’ve done my homework. I know what normal is. I have an understanding. I trust the people. There’s a saying that goes, you know you would never invest with somebody more money than you’re willing to kiss goodbye. Don’t invest money that you don’t have. Don’t invest from your retirement if you’re not willing to kiss that goodbye. Then, don’t invest in something that you’re not totally familiar with, and second point is, never invest with somebody that you have not known for at least one year. That’s a minimum, and you know you followed their integrity for at least one year. I’ve just picked one year. Let’s say extended time. There’s all kinds of people that are gonna come to you in the business world with a deal that’s too good to be true. It’s probably not true. Save yourself some money. Save yourself some heartache. Don’t do what I’m telling you, other than really dig deep. Well, I just hope this has been of help to you. I hope that you will take these videos and apply them when they apply. My business career didn’t allow me to go back to college. I don’t know that that would have helped me. I didn’t go for like six months of training. I had to take business training on the fly. A piece here, a piece there, a speech here, a talk here, a seminar, a part of a book, and I hope that this is, even though it’s seven to nine minutes typically on these videos, it’s not much, but we hope that you can take this as a bite. Not everything will apply to you, but we hope that they’re beneficial enough where you watch many of these videos, and listen to them on podcast, and then share them with others if you would. Thanks for being a part of this.

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Gary Shotton
Founder | IBBTalks.com
The founder of IBBTalks.com which was formed to "Inspire Better Business."
As an astute businessman, he is passionate about helping others in the business world achieve maximum profits. He has a keen interest in international business. www.InspiringBetterBusiness.com

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